This page provides data on key family violence indicators in the City of Boroondara, including the number of family violence incidents and the rate of family violence incidents.

Following definition used by Department of Human Services (2018), family violence “includes not only physical injury but direct or indirect threats, sexual assault, emotional and psychological torment, economic control, damage to property, social isolation and any behaviour which causes a person to live in fear".

Statistics on recorded family violence incidents are likely to significantly underestimate the magnitude of the problem.

A survey conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics revealed that police were contacted in relation to 17% of current partner violence instances and 25% to 35% of instances of violence perpetrated by a previous partner (depending on the gender of the victim).  

The increase in recorded family violence incidents shown in Figure 1 does not necessarily mean that family violence incidents have increased.

Enhanced reporting by police and greater confidence among victims that they will receive assistance from police are likely to account for much of the increase in recorded incidents (Royal Commission into Family Violence 2016).

Family violence incidents per 100,000 population

Figure 1 shows recorded police call outs for family violence incidents represented as a rate per 100,000 population for City of Boroondara and Victoria from 2000-01 to 2019-20.

The chart shows a steady upward trend across Victoria and Boroondara in the rate of family violence incidents reported from 2000-01, when the Chief Commission of Police announced a review of all matters relating to violence against women, and followed by Victoria Police implementing a new Code of Practice, emphasising the seriousness of family violence in 2003-04.

Figure 1 continues to show a steep increase in the rates of family violence reports per 100,000 residents across Victoria, after Police Issued Family Violence Safety Notices were introduced with the implementation of the Family Violence Protection Act 2008, in 2008-09.

The City of Boroondara continued to show a steady upward trend in family violence incidents from 2008-09, with a large increase in family violence reports between 2011-12 and 2012-13, from where rates have not dropped.

A graph showing family voilence incidents per 100,000 population

Figure 1: Recorded police call outs for family violence incidents: Rate per 100,000 population, 2000-01 to 2019-20 (source: Crime Statistics Agency)

Number of family violence incidents

Table 1: Recorded family violence incidents, 2015-16 to 2019-20

Area

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

Victoria

77,779

76,500

76,113

82,652

88,214

Eastern Metropolitan Region

8,628

8,190

8,064

8,659

9,470

Boroondara

837

813

810

851

950

 

Rate of family violence incidents per 100,000 population

Table 2: Rate per 100,000 residents by site of occurrence, 2015-16 to 2019-20

Area

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

Victoria

1,289

1,238

1,178

1,253

1,315

Eastern Metropolitan Region

528

485

774

831

 

Boroondara

478

458

447

465

515

According to the Crime Statistics Agency, 75% (61,177) of the 88,216 family members affected by family violence in Victoria in the last 12 months were female, while 25% (21,937) were male.

Number of family members affected by family violence

Figure 2 shows the recorded number of family members affected by family violence by age and gender in Victoria for year ending June 2012.

It shows that female family members were significantly more vulnerable than men, with women between 20 to 49 years of age being the most prevalent cohort of family members affected by domestic violence.

A graph showing recorded number of family members affected by family voilence by age, gender in Victoria ending June 2020

Figure 2: Recorded number of family members affected by family violence by age and gender, Victoria, year ending June 2020 (source: Crime Statistics Agency)

Support services

Safe Steps Family Violence and Response provides 24-hour support for women and children experiencing violence and abuse from someone close to them.

1800RESPECT provides confidential online and phone counselling, information and referral service for anyone experiencing sexual assault, and domestic and family violence.

MensLine is a telephone and online counselling service offering support for Australian men anywhere, anytime. 

Men’s Referral Service provides support by men for men to help them stop using violent and controlling behaviour.

Multicultural Centre Against Family Violence is a specialist family violence service that works with women from migrant and refugee backgrounds, their families and their communities, in non-English languages. 

The Orange Door is a free service for adults, children and young people who are experiencing or have experienced family violence and families who need extra support with the care of children.

Victims Support Agency provide victims with practical assistance, counselling and support through the justice system.

For other support services, see our Mental health and crisis support page.

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