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Southern brown tree frog (Litoria ewingii)

Southern Brown Tree Frog

Southern Brown Tree Frog. Image by Ian Moodie.

The Southern brown tree frog is a common species found in great numbers in flooded grasslands or marshes.

  • It is a small frog, growing to approximately 45mm long.
  • The adults have pale fawn, cream, orange or light brown sides.
  • It is an agile climber and jumper.
  • Similar to other small tree frogs, this species is a voracious insect eater, capable of leaping to catch a fly in mid-flight.
  • The males make a 'creeee creee creee cree cree' call.
  • The Southern brown tree frog lives in trees, shrubs, and rock or log crevices on the ground or in damp vegetation.
  • It is also comfortable under pot plants and woodpiles.
  • It can be found in gardens in suburban Melbourne. It has been seen in Balwyn, Camberwell, East Kew and Kew.
  • The Southern brown tree frog is endangered in Boroondara.
  • It is threatened by introduced predators such as cats and foxes.
  • They are also extremely susceptible to pollution in waterways as they primarily breathe through their skin which is a poor barrier to pollutants. We can help by not polluting our streets and waterways.
  • To help with the preservation of the Southern brown tree frog, create a shallow pond with gently sloping banks and logs, rocks, leaf litter and shrubs to provide shade, shelter and protection.
  • Keep cats in at night to protect frogs and tadpoles.
  • Avoid using chemical sprays and insecticides.
  • Allow the frog to move into your garden naturally.

Striped marsh frog (Limnodynastes peronii)

Striped Marsh Frog

Striped Marsh Frog. Image by Ian Moodie.

Striped marsh frogs are a large species of frog, growing to a length of 75mm.

  • They have distinctive, alternating light and dark stripes on their body as well as a pale, narrow stripe down the centre of their back.
  • They eat a variety of insects as well as almost any animal smaller than themselves, including other frogs.
  • Their reproduction season is from August to March and tadpoles can be found all year round.
  • The male frogs have a 'tock-' or 'poc'-like call.
  • Striped marsh frogs live among wetland reeds and rushes in rainforests, open woodlands, farmland and urban wetlands.
  • In Boroondara, the call of the Striped marsh frog can be heard in winter and spring emanating from Glass Creek in Hays Paddock, Willsmere Billabong and Back Creek in Camberwell.
  • The Striped marsh frog is endangered in Boroondara, but secure in Melbourne.
  • The Striped marsh frog is threatened by introduced predators such as cats and foxes.
  • They are also extremely susceptible to pollution in waterways as they primarily breathe through their skin, which is a poor barrier to pollutants. We can help by not polluting our streets and waterways.
  • To help with the preservation of the Striped marsh frog, create a shallow pond with gently sloping banks and logs, rocks, leaf litter and shrubs to provide shade, shelter and protection.
  • Keep cats in at night to protect frogs and tadpoles.
  • Avoid using chemical sprays and insecticides.
  • Allow the frog to move into your garden naturally.
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