Install an aerial or antenna

You may need a Planning Permit, Building Permit or both to install an aerial or antenna on your property.

You won't need a Planning Permit to install a television antenna, or an aerial or antenna considered to be a Low Impact Telecommunication Facilities, however you may still need a Building Permit for these works. 

How to use this guide

To help you work out which permits you need, begin at Step 1 and answer the questions one at a time. You may need to refer to your installation design and take measurements.

Before you begin

Before finalising your design:

  • Check for easements on your property. When an easement is obstructed, it can prevent important maintenance work and block the flow of stormwater. If your plans impact an easement, it may be necessary to modify your plans.
  • See if the property is listed under Schedule to Clause 51.01 Specific Sites and Exclusions. If the property is listed, contact Statutory Planning on 9278 4888 to find out about special restrictions and exemptions that apply.

If you need help with Planning Permits, contact our Statutory Planning team on 9278 4888 or email Statutory Planning.
 
If you need help with Building Permits, contact our Building Services team on 9278 4999 or email Building Services.

Check the type of antenna or aerial you are installing

You do not need Planning permission to install:  

  • a television antenna
  • a Low Impact Telecommunications Facility.

For a definition of Low Impact Telecommunications Facility, see the Federal Register of Legislation.

Are you installing a television antenna or Low Impact Telecommunications Facility?

 

Check if you are installing an aerial or antenna in a Heritage Overlay

  1. Visit Planning Maps Online and search for the address of your property.
  2. Select Get Report. Follow the prompts to create and open a free Planning Property Report.
  3. On the Report, go to the Planning Overlay section to see whether a Heritage Overlay affects your property.
  4. In the Planning Overlay section, look at the map to see the area of your site covered by the Heritage Overlay. Refer to your plans to see whether you will be performing works in that area.

Are the proposed works in a Heritage Overlay?

 

Check if your property is on the Victorian Heritage Register

  1. Refer to the map from Planning Maps Online.
  2. Look for the Heritage Overlay Schedule link and take note of the schedule number.
  3. Click the Heritage Overlay Schedule link. The Schedule to the Heritage Overlay page appears.
  4. Find your schedule number. See whether the 'Included on the Victorian Heritage Register' column displays 'Yes' for your schedule number.

If the property is on the Victorian Heritage Register:

  • You may need approval from Heritage Victoria for or any buildings and works including internal changes. Contact Heritage Victoria for advice on how to apply for their approval.
  • You may continue to apply for other permits while your Heritage Victoria application is being assessed. But you can only begin construction after all necessary approvals and permits are granted.
  • Note that you may also require a Planning Permit from Council if your property is affected by other overlays. These are discussed later in this guide.

Is your property listed on the Victorian Heritage Register?

Check if a Public Acquisition, Land Subject to Inundation or Design and Development Overlay affects the works

Refer to the report from Planning Maps Online and see whether the works are within any of the following:

  • Public Acquisition Overlay
  • Land Subject to Inundation Overlay
  • Design and Development Overlay (except for Design and Development Overlay Schedule 4).

Are you installing an aerial or antenna in a Land Subject to Inundation, Public Acquisition or Design and Development Overlay (other than Schedule 4)?

 

 

Check if a Significant Landscape Overlay affects the works

Refer to the report from Planning Maps Online and see whether the works are within a Significant Landscape Overlay.

Measure the aerial or antenna to see whether it is greater than 6 metres in height.

Are you installing an aerial or antenna over 6 metres high in a Significant Landscape Overlay?

 

Check if a Special Building Overlay affects the works

Refer to the report from Planning Maps Online and see whether the works are within a Special Building Overlay.

Refer to the design to see whether the aerial or antenna is attached to an existing building.

Will the aerial or antenna be in a Special Building Overlay and not attached to an existing building?

Apply for a Planning Permit, if needed

If you have determined that you need a Planning Permit for your project:

  1. Obtain a clear copy of your Certificate of Title including the lot plan. You can get this from the Landata website. The Certificate of Title must be no more than 28 days' old.
  2. Write a cover letter explaining your proposal.
  3. Obtain a design response or explanation of the proposed use of the aerial or antenna. A design response is a plan that depicts how the proposed design responds to its context. It supports the proposal by showing how the design works within the site's constraints.
  4. Prepare a plan drawn to scale (1:100 or 1:200) with full dimensions. The plan must show the site, floor layout and elevations.
  5. Complete the Planning Permit application form and lodge the form, fee and supporting documents with Council. 
    To download the form and submit the application, see Apply for a Planning Permit.
  6. Now, check whether you need a Building Permit.

Fees

If the antenna or aerial is associated with a single dwelling on a lot, the following fees apply:
$199.90 if the cost of the works is less than $10,000.
$629.40 if the cost of the works is between $10,000 and $100,000.

If the antenna or aerial is not associated with a single dwelling on a lot, the following fees apply:
$1147.80 if the cost of the works is less than $100,000.
$1547.60 if the cost of the works is between $100,000 and $1,000,000.

Check whether the aerial or antenna is attached or freestanding

An aerial or antenna may be attached to a roof or may be a freestanding structure. Consult your plans to see how your aerial or antenna will be installed.

Will the aerial or antenna be attached to the roof?
 

 

Check the height of an attached aerial or antenna

Measurements for an aerial attached to a roof

Measure the distance from the top of the aerial or antenna to the highest point where it will be attached to the building.

 

Is the distance you measured more than 3m?

  • If yes, you will need a Building Permit. Go to the next step to see whether you also need Report and Consent of Council.
  • If no, you don't need a Building Permit. As long as there are no Planning Permit restrictions, you can install the aerial or antenna. You can now exit this guide.

 

Check if the attached aerial or antenna requires Report and Consent

Before you install an attached aerial or antenna, you may need Report and Consent of Council.

Measure the distance from the top of the aerial or antenna to the highest point of the roof.

Is the distance you measured more than 3m?

 

 

 

 

Check the height of a freestanding aerial or antenna

Measurements for a freestanding aerial

Measure the distance from the top of the aerial or antenna to natural ground level.

Is the distance you measured more than 8m?

  • If yes, apply for a Building Permit.
  • If no, you don't need to apply for a Building Permit. As long as there are no Planning Permit restrictions, you can install the aerial or antenna. You can now exit this guide.

 

 

 

Apply for a Building Permit, if needed

If you have determined that you need a Building Permit for your project:

  1. Complete the Application for a Building Permit.
  2. Read the Building Permit application checklist to determine which supporting documents you need for your circumstances. If you are unsure about what you need, contact the Building Services team on 9278 4999 or email Building Services.
  3. If you applied for Report and Consent of Council, provide evidence that Report and Consent was granted.
  4. Lodge the Building Permit application form, fee and supporting documents with Council. For fee information, email Building Services.

You can only begin your installation after the Building Permit is granted.

You may exit the guide.

Timeline

Statutory Planning aims to respond to Planning Permit applications within 60 days, as governed by the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

Building Permit applications are assessed within 10 business days. The response is usually a request for further information that is required before a Building Permit can be issued.