City of Boroondara statistics covering:

This information is complemented by the City of Boroondara Community Profile, which analyses demographics for the City and its suburbs based on results from the ABS Census

Dwelling forecasts

According to Council's forecasts, Boroondara's dwelling count will increase by 7,542 between 2018 and 2028, from 72,248 to 79,790. For more information on forecast dwelling growth, see population and dwellings on the Forecast .id website. 

Housing and population density

In the 2016 Census, there were 69,419 private dwellings counted in Boroondara with 6,495 of these considered unoccupied.  

The main dwelling type in Boroondara is separate houses (54.4%), however, the amount of particular dwelling types varies across suburbs. For example, high density dwellings are more concentrated in Hawthorn and Hawthorn East, whereas Balwyn North, Deepdene and Ashburton have few or no high density dwellings, and relatively few medium density dwellings (see Table 1). 

Between the 2006 and 2016 Censuses, the proportion of dwellings that were separate houses decreased in Boroondara overall (-7.1%), a trend that also occurred across the Eastern Metropolitan Region (-4.3%) and Greater Melbourne (-5.1%). Population density increases with dwelling density, and suburbs with higher dwelling density have a higher population density (see Table 2).

Table 1: Proportion of dwellings that are separate houses, medium density, and high density, by suburb (Source: ABS, 2016 Census) 

Area

Separate house

Medium density

High density

Boroondara

54.4%

30.7%

14.0%

Ashburton

75.0%

23.4%

0.2%

Balwyn

59.9%

34.0%

5.4%

Balwyn North

84.5%

14.3%

0.6%

Camberwell

58.9%

32.4%

7.5%

Canterbury

64.0%

28.3%

6.4%

Deepdene

67.4%

32.3%

0.0%

Glen Iris

70.1%

22.7%

6.8%

Hawthorn

22.4%

35.6%

41.0%

Hawthorn East

33.7%

35.2%

30.4%

Kew

49.1%

37.8%

11.9%

Kew East

65.0%

33.3%

1.2%

Surrey Hills

66.1%

31.4%

1.7%


Table 2: Population density, by suburb (Source: ABS, 2016 Census; and ABS, Regional Population Growth 2016-17) 

Boroondara suburb

(SA2 geography)#

Area (km2)

Population density 2017

(persons/km2)

Ashburton

2.8

2922

Balwyn

5.6

3029

Balwyn North

8.8

2424

Camberwell

7.3

3125

Glen Iris - East

5.7

3052

Hawthorn

5.7

4432

Hawthorn East

3.8

4364

Kew

10.5

2521

Kew East

4

1712

Surrey Hills (West) - Canterbury

5.7

3045


# Statistical Area 2s are ABS defined geographical areas that generally match to suburb boundaries

Table 3 shows the change in the number of separate houses and medium/high density for suburbs in Boroondara. All suburbs experienced an increase in medium/high density dwellings and a decrease in separate houses except for Balwyn/Deepdene, Canterbury, and Surrey Hills which recorded increases for both types of dwellings. 

Hawthorn had the highest increase in the number of medium/high density dwellings with an additional 2,537 medium/high density dwellings -built between 2006 and 2016. Hawthorn also recorded the highest loss of separate houses, losing 574 over this time. The next highest increase in medium/high density dwellings occurred in Kew (1,257 additional medium/high density dwellings), Camberwell (1,084 additional medium/high density dwellings), and Hawthorn East (957 additional medium/high density dwellings). 

Suburbs which had the highest loss of separate houses after Hawthorn were Hawthorn East (246 fewer separate houses), Kew (200 fewer separate houses) and Ashburton (124 fewer separate houses). 

Table 3: Change in the number of separate houses and medium/high density dwellings between 2006 and 2016, by suburb (Source: ABS, 2016 Census)

Suburb

Separate house

Medium / high density

Ashburton

-124

224

Balwyn North

111

-2

Balwyn/Deepdene

18

303

Camberwell

-41

1084

Canterbury

34

214

Glen Iris

-24

580

Hawthorn

-574

2537

Hawthorn East

-246

957

Kew

-200

1257

Kew East

-32

125

Surrey Hills

28

17

Total

-1033

7306

Household type and dwelling density

Table 4 shows the breakdown of households in Boroondara by dwelling type. Similar to the proportions of dwelling types in Boroondara overall, around half of couples without children households were in separate houses (51.6%), 31.6% in medium density, and 16% in high density.

In comparison, couples with children were most likely to live in separate houses (77.7%), and lone person and group households (that is a household consisting of two or more unrelated people where all persons are aged 15 years and over and there are no reported couple relationships, parent-child relationships or other blood relationships in these households), were more likely to live in medium and high density dwellings (66% and 71% respectively lived in medium or high density dwellings). 

Table 4: Proportion of dwellings by household type (Source: ABS, 2016 Census)

Dwellings

Separate house

Medium density

High density

Total dwellings

54.4%

30.7%

14.0%

Couple only households

51.6%

31.6%

16.0%

Couple with children households

77.7%

18.9%

3.1%

One parent households

60.3%

32.7%

6.6%

Lone person households

33.2%

41.8%

24.1%

Group households

27.2%

41.0%

30.5%


Note: Rows do not equal 100% as ‘other’ and ‘not stated’ are shown

Non-private dwellings

Non-private dwellings are dwellings which are not self-contained and therefore provide a communal form of accommodation. In 2016, 140 non-private dwellings housing 4,765 people were counted in the City of Boroondara. The two most common types were hostels for the disabled (30 dwellings), and accommodation for the retired or aged (29 dwellings). 

Non-private dwelling types that had the highest residential populations were accommodation for the retired or aged (not self-contained) (1,441 residents in 29 dwellings), nursing homes (711 residents in 16 dwellings), and residential college, hall of residence (649 residents in three dwellings).

Table 5: Number of occupied non-private dwellings and number of residents, by dwelling type, Boroondara (Source: ABS, 2016 Census) 

Non-private dwelling

Number of dwellings

Total number of residents

Hostel for the disabled

30

179

Accommodation for the retired or aged (not self-contained)

29

1,441

Nursing home

16

711

Boarding house, private hotel

12

298

Convent, monastery, etc.

12

120

Boarding school

9

252

Hotel, motel, bed and breakfast

7

449

Private hospital (not psychiatric)

7

174

Public hospital (not psychiatric)

6

226

Other and non-classifiable

6

136

Residential college, hall of residence

3

649

Psychiatric hospital or institution

3

130

Total

140

4,765

Public housing 

The City of Boroondara has very low numbers of social housing stock. The Department of Health and Human Services reported that in June 2017 there were 782 social housing dwellings in Boroondara which represents approximately 1.1% of all Boroondara dwellings, compared to 1.9% of all Eastern Metropolitan Region dwellings. According to the 2016 Census, the municipality is ranked 71 out of 79 Victorian Local Government Areas for residents in social housing accommodation (with rank 1 having the highest proportion of residents in social housing). 

Due to the low provision of social housing stock, there are extensive waiting lists for social housing. The Office of Housing March 2018 waiting lists for the Box Hill Regional Office (covering the cities of Boroondara, Whitehorse and Manningham), show 1,749 people waiting for social housing and an additional 292 people waiting to transfer to more suitable housing within the social housing system.

Table 6: Applicants on Office of Housing waiting lists, Box Hill Regional Office (includes Boroondara, Whitehorse and Manningham local government areas), March 2018 (Source: Department of Health and Human Services 2018, Public housing waiting and transfer list)

Waiting list type

Early housing*

Wait turn

Total

Public housing

901

848

1,749

Public housing transfer (in public housing awaiting transfer to another location)

140

152

292

Total

1,041

1,000

2,041

*people at risk of homelessness, that have support needs, and/or living in inappropriate housing for their circumstances

Rooming houses and supported residential services

Consumer Affairs Victoria defines rooming houses as a ‘building where one or more rooms are available to rent, and four or more people in total can occupy those rooms’. Rooming houses must be registered with the local council and meet minimum health and safety standards. In June 2018, there were 16 registered rooming houses in Boroondara, eight of these had between 1 and 10 rooms, five had between 21 to 35 rooms, and three had more than 35 rooms.

The Department of Health and Human Services defines Supported Residential Services (SRS) as privately operated businesses that provide accommodation and support for Victorians who need help with everyday activities. Each SRS determines the services it offers and its fee structure. In May 2018 there were six SRSs operating in Boroondara.  

Building approval trends

In the 2016-17 financial year, 1,753 new dwellings were approved in Boroondara. Of these around one quarter were houses (25.4%) and three quarters were other residential dwellings such as semi-detached, row or terrace houses or townhouses, and flats, units or apartments (74.4%).

Table 7 shows that between 2012-13 and 2016-17, dwelling approvals in Boroondara for new houses remained fairly stable averaging 507 approvals per year.  However, approvals for new other residential dwellings increased steadily from 1,019 in 2012-13 to 1,272 in 2014-15 before falling sharply in 2015-16 to 610. However in 2016-17, approvals for other residential buildings were back in line with the longer term upwards trend with 1,304 approvals. 

Table 7: Number of building approvals in Boroondara for new houses and other residential buildings, 2012-13 and 2016-17 (Source: ABS, Building Approvals, March 2018) 

Building type

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

New houses

414

554

555

564

446

New other residential building

1,019

1,233

1,272

610

1,304

Total dwellings

1,444

1,792

1,873

1,185

1,753


Housing costs and affordability

Rent 

Median weekly rents in Boroondara for all dwelling types are higher than the metropolitan Melbourne median (see Table 8). Rental costs between Melbourne and Boroondara widen as dwellings increase in size, and a four-bedroom house in Boroondara costs almost double that of Melbourne overall ($850 weekly rent per week compared to $440 per week).

The Department of Health and Human Services reported that in the December Quarter 2017 there were no affordable dwellings available in Boroondara for families receiving a Centrelink payment.


Table 8: Median weekly rent, December quarter 2017 (Source: Department of Human Services - Quarterly Rental Reports 2018)

Dwelling type

Median weekly rent December qtr. 2017 Boroondara

Median weekly rent December qtr. 2017 Melbourne

% increase from December qtr. 2016 Boroondara

% increase from December qtr. 2016 Melbourne

One-bedroom flat

$350

$360

2.9%

5.9%

Two-bedroom flat

$450

$420

5.9%

5.0%

Two-bedroom house

$520

$420

3.0%

5.0%

Three-bedroom house

$650

$395

4.3%

3.9%

Four-bedroom house

$850

$440

-2.3%

2.3%

House prices

Figure 1 shows the median price for houses and units/apartments for Boroondara and metropolitan Melbourne between 1986 and 2016. In 2016, the median house price in Boroondara was $1.96 million, compared to $635,000 in metropolitan Melbourne and units/apartments in Boroondara were $665,000 compared to $494,000 in metropolitan Melbourne.  

Over this period, house prices in Boroondara have increased from a median price that was 57% higher than the metropolitan Melbourne median ($129,000 compared to $82,000), to being 207% higher in 2016. Median prices for units/apartments in Boroondara and metropolitan Melbourne have increased at a similar pace.

Figure 1 shows the median price for houses and units/apartments for Boroondara and metropolitan Melbourne between 1986 and 2016.Over this period, house prices in Boroondara have increased from a median price that was 57% higher than the metropolitan Melbourne median ($129,000 compared to $82,000), to being 207% higher in 2016.

Figure 1: Median house price and median unit/apartment price in Boroondara and metropolitan Melbourne, 2006 to 2016 (Source: Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning

Homelessness

The number of people in Boroondara who were homeless on Census night increased from 383 in 2011, to 426 in 2016. This was the second largest increase (11.2%) in the Eastern Metropolitan Region (EMR). Table 9 shows homelessness counts across the EMR and Table 10 shows homelessness counts for the different types of homelessness in Boroondara.

These homelessness counts are likely to underestimate homelessness because having no access to accommodation can present a range of barriers to completing a Census form. However, the increase aligns with the increase in reports to Council relating to instances of homelessness, with 76 reports made in 2017 compared to seven in 2009. It is important to note that each report to Council may not indicate a single incidence of homelessness, as multiple reports can be received for any one location.

Table 9: Homelessness counts in the Eastern Metropolitan Region, selected Census years (Source: ABS, 2016 Census - Estimating Homelessness)

Area

2006

2011

2016

2016 homelessness rate (per 1000 residents)

Boroondara

312

383

426

2.5

Maroondah

308

425

321

2.4

Knox

254

250

365

1.9

Monash

465

865

842

2.9

Manningham

123

206

219

4.6

Whitehorse

497

736

742

4.6

Yarra Ranges

284

335

366

2.4

Total Eastern Metropolitan Region

2,243

3,150

3,281

3.1

Table 10: Homelessness counts by type of homelessness, City of Boroondara, 2016 (Source: ABS, 2016 Census - Estimating Homelessness)

Type of homelessness

No. of people

Persons living in improvised dwellings, tents, or sleeping out

4

Persons in supported accommodation for the homeless

56

Persons staying temporarily with other households

35

Persons living in boarding houses

250

Persons living in 'severely' crowded dwellings

87

All homeless persons

426


Further information

For more information, email Research or contact Council.

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