City of Boroondara statistics covering:

  • density
  • building
  • housing costs
  • social housing
  • homelessness.

This information is complemented by the City of Boroondara Community Profile, which analyses demographics for the city and its suburbs based on results from the 2011, 2006, 2001, 1996 and 1991 Censuses of Population and Housing. The profile is updated with population estimates when the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) releases new figures.

Housing and population density

In 2011, there were an estimated 65,021 private (that is, self-contained) dwellings in Boroondara. Most are separate houses (Figure 1).

Private dwellings by structure type Boroondara 2011 Census

Figure 1: Private dwellings by structure type, City of Boroondara, 2011 Census (source: Profile .id)

The predominant dwelling structure type varies across Boroondara. For example, higher density dwellings are more concentrated in Hawthorn and Hawthorn East while Balwyn North and Ashburton have few or no high density dwellings and relatively few medium density dwellings (Figure 2). The pattern of population density follows that of dwelling density (Table 1).

Proportion of persons who spoke another language and spoke English at home not well or not at all - Figure 2

Figure 2: Medium and high density dwellings, the City of Boroondara, 2011 Census

Table 1: Population density, City of Boroondara, 2011

Suburb

Persons per hectare

Ashburton

26.5

Balwyn

29.2

Balwyn North

22.7

Camberwell

27.4

Canterbury

24.9

Deepdene

23.7

Glen Iris

28.2

Hawthorn

36.8

Hawthorn East

35.4

Kew

22.3

Kew East

15.9

Surrey Hills

30.3

City of Boroondara

26.6

Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion Boroondara dwellings that were separate houses decreased, a trend also apparent for the Eastern Metropolitan Region and Greater Melbourne (Figure 3).

Proportion of City of Boroondara residents who volunteer by age group and gender 2011 Census - Figure 13

Figure 3: Proportion of dwellings that are separate houses, 1991 to 2011 Censuses

Household type and dwelling density

In 2011, 85% of couples with children lived in separate houses and 14% lived in high density dwellings. In contrast, more than half of lone person and group households lived in either medium or high density dwellings (Figure 4).

Proportion of dwellings and households by dwelling density City of Boroondara - 2011 Census - Figure 4

Figure 4: Proportion of dwellings and households by dwelling density, City of Boroondara, 2011 Census

Non-private dwellings

Non-private dwellings are dwellings which are not self-contained and therefore provide a communal form of accommodation. In 2011, 145 occupied non-private dwellings housing 4467 people were counted in the City of Boroondara. Half of these dwellings were aged accommodation or hostels for people with a disability (Figure 5). Unoccupied non-private dwellings are not counted in the Census.

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Figure 5: Number of occupied non-private dwellings by dwelling type, City of Boroondara, 2011 Census

Building approval trends

In the 2015-16 financial year approval was granted for 1128 new dwellings in Boroondara. Of these, 513 (46%) were for houses and 604 (54%) were for other dwellings such as semi-detached, row or terrace houses or townhouses, and flats, units or apartments.

Between 2005-06 and 2015-16, permits for new houses have remained fairly stable but approvals for other dwellings have been increasing steadily since 2010-11 before falling sharply in the latest reporting period.

 

Dwelling forecasts

According to Council's forecasts, Boroondara's dwelling count will increase by 10,771 between 2015 and 2025, from 68,413 to 77,327. For more information on forecast dwelling growth, see the population and dwellings page of our Forecast .id website.

Housing costs and affordability

Housing affordability is an issue of concern in Boroondara, with rents and real estate prices among the highest in Melbourne for most dwelling types (Table 2 and Table 3).

Table 2: Median weekly rent, March quarter 2016
  Median   % increase from March qtr 2016  
 

Boroondara

Melbourne

Boroondara

Melbourne

One-bedroom flat

$280

$320

44%

60%

Two-bedroom flat

$420

$400

68%

74%

Three-bedroom flat

$540

$445

54%

65%

Two-bedroom house

$480

$413

52%

72%

Three-bedroom house

$625

$380

79%

65%

Four-bedroom house

$850

$440

70%

52%

Source: Department of Human Services - Quarterly Rental Reports

Table 3: Median house and unit prices, 2015
 

Median

 

% increase from 2014

 
 

Boroondara

Melbourne

Boroondara

Melbourne

Houses

$1,900,000

$600,000

18.5%

8.1%

Units

$680,000

$482,500

10.6%

3.2%

Source: Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning

Affordable house prices at each household income point can be calculated on the basis of the prevailing home loan interest rates for the year of analysis and other assumptions about housing loans. It is assumed that loan repayments will be less than 30% of household income, that the amount borrowed will be 90% of the affordable house price, and that the loan term will be 25 years. Only 12 houses sold in Boroondara in 2013 were affordable for the lower 50% of Melbourne households, by income. A larger number of units (394) were affordable for the lower 50% of Melbourne households by income, and these represented just less than one third of the units sold in Boroondara in 2013.

Table 4: Affordability of houses and units sold in 2013

Household income decile

Household income

Maximum affordable house price

Houses

 

 

Units

 

 

     

Boroondara

 

Melbourne

Boroondara

 

Melbourne

 

 

 

No.

%

%

No.

%

%

1st

$21,528

$90,185

1

0%

0%

38

3%

3%

2nd

$33,332

$139,634

4

0%

4%

69

5%

12%

3rd

$46,020

$192,787

8

0%

25%

136

10%

36%

4th

$59,592

$249,643

12

1%

47%

394

30%

61%

5th

$75,140

$314,777

27

1%

63%

715

54%

81%

6th

$93,756

$392,763

80

4%

77%

954

72%

91%

7th

$115,752

$484,908

315

15%

86%

1119

85%

96%

8th

$143,884

$602,759

643

32%

91%

1206

92%

98%

9th

$177,996

$745,661

1126

55%

95%

1273

97%

99%

Total houses/units sold

 

 

2,033

   

1,318

 

 

Source: Housing in Victoria - custom report

The 'private rental affordability for low income (Centrelink) households' indicator measures the number of rental dwellings which are affordable to households dependent on Centrelink income. To calculate private rental affordability for low income households, dwelling size is matched to particular household types receiving Centrelink incomes, as follows:

  • one bedroom: singles on Newstart
  • two bedrooms: single parent with one child
  • three bedrooms: couple on Newstart with two children
  • four bedrooms: couple on Newstart with four children.

For each bedroom size/household type, rent assistance is subtracted from the rent, and the resulting rent is divided by the Centrelink income for that household type. Where the rent to income ratio is less than 30%, the dwelling is regarded as affordable.

Further data on affordability and available housing stock, and on the method of calculation is available from the Housing in Victoria website.

Table 5: Affordability of private rentals for low-income households, March Quarter 2016
  Boroondara   Melbourne

Dwelling size

Number

%

%

One bedroom

0

0.0%

0.3%

Two bedroom

4

0.4%

2.2%

Three bedroom

1

0.2%

9.3%

Four or more bedrooms

7

3.1%

25.9%

Total affordable dwellings

12

0.5%

6.4%

Source: Department of Human Services - Current Rental Report

Bankwest's 3rd Key Worker Housing Affordability report examined housing affordability in Local Government Areas across Australia for 5 groups of key public sector worker: nurses, teachers, police officers, fire-fighters and ambulance officers. The report found that the City of Boroondara was the second least affordable Local Government Area in Victoria after the City of Stonnington in 2010. Ambulance and police officers needed the equivalent of 16.2 times their annual income to buy a median-priced house in Boroondara. For nurses, the figure was 24.7. The report also found that the City of Boroondara had the most unaffordable median unit price for all Victorian Local Government Areas.

In 2013, a person on an average weekly wage would need to pay 76% of their income towards their mortgage if buying a median-priced house in Boroondara, considerably higher than the Melbourne average of 28% (Figure 7).

Ratio of housing cost to household income houses 1994-2013 - Figure 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 7: Ratio of housing cost to household income, houses, 1994–2013* (source: Housing in Victoria - custom report)

*2012 data not available.

Further data on affordability and available stock, and on the method of calculating 'affordability' is available from the Housing in Victoria website.

Housing stress

A 2011 (unpublished) survey of 1003 Boroondara households conducted by Council revealed that of the 427 who were renting or had a mortgage, almost two-thirds experienced either moderate (43%) or heavy (19%) housing-related financial stress (Table 6).

Table 6: Housing-related financial stress, City of Boroondara, 2010

Stress level

Number of households

% of renters

% of mortgagees

No stress

60

14.3%

13.3%

Little stress

101

25.1%

20.4%

Moderate stress

185

44.5%

40.3%

Great stress

81

16.1%

26.1%

Total

427

100%

100%

Public housing stock and waiting lists

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) reports there were 812 social housing dwellings in Boroondara at June 2015. Of these, 755 were owned by DHHS and 57 were community owned. Based on 2012 DHHS social housing figures and the 2011 Census, 1.3% of the City of Boroondara dwellings were social housing, compared to 2.0% of Eastern Metropolitan Region dwellings and 3.5% of dwellings across all 31 metropolitan Melbourne local government areas.

Waiting lists for social housing are lengthy, as shown in Table 7.

Table 7: Applicants on Office of Housing waiting lists, Box Hill Regional Office (Cities of Boroondara, Whitehorse and Manningham), June 201

Waiting list type

Early housing (at risk of homelessness, have support needs,

living in inappropriate housing for their circumstances)

Wait turn

Total

Public housing

548

1421

1969

Public housing transfer (in public housing awaiting transfer to another location)

195

199

394

Total

743

1620

2363

Source: Department of Human Services - Public housing waiting and transfer list

Rooming houses and supported residential services

A rooming house is a building where:

  • one or more rooms are available for rent; and
  • at least 4 people may occupy those rooms; and
  • each resident pays rent.

Rooming houses must be registered with the local council and meet minimum health and safety standards, although not all rooming house operators comply with these requirements.

In 2016, there were 18 registered rooming houses in Boroondara, 9 of these were between 1 and 10 rooms and only 3 had more than 35 rooms.

A 2014 survey completed by 13 Boroondara rooming house operators revealed that:

  • 62% of registered rooming houses housed students, 62% housed unemployed or pensioner residents and 46% housed part-time employed residents and 8% housed full-time employed residents (respondents could select more than one of these options so percentages do not sum to 100)
  • 18% of residents in the registered rooming houses were women
  • 34% of residents were of a non-English speaking background
  • 31% of residents were aged between 15 and 30 years and 63% were aged between 30 and 60 years
  • no residents were aged under 15 years
  • 54% of registered rooming house operators indicated that residents were mostly long term (more than 12 months), up from 37% in 2011 (based on an earlier rooming house survey)
  • 23% of registered rooming house operators reported that residents were mostly medium term and another 23% reported that residents were a combination of short, medium and long term.

Supported Residential Services (SRS) are mostly small private businesses that provide accommodation and personal care, usually assistance with personal hygiene, toileting, dressing, meals and medication, as well as physical and emotional support. SRS receive no government funding and are able to set their own fees and charges which can range from 85% of the pension up to $1000 per week or more. All 6 SRS in Boroondara charge ‘above-pension’ fees.

There were 5 fewer SRS and 227 fewer SRS beds in Boroondara in 2016 than there were in 2013, with facilities in Balwyn, Glen Iris, Kew and Hawthorn no longer operating as registered SRS. A Department of Health Census of Victorian SRS operators conducted in 2013 revealed that only 72% of 'above pension' SRS operators planned to continue operating as an SRS throughout the following 3 years.

Table 9: Registered Supported Residential Services, City of Boroondara, June 2016
Suburb Number of Supported Residential Services Supported Residential Service beds
Ashburton 2 105
Camberwell 1 31
Hawthorn 2 85
Kew 1 25
Total 6 246

Source: Department of Health - List of registered supported residential services

Homelessness

The ABS produces counts of homeless persons based on the Census. In 2012 the ABS adopted a new method for estimating homelessness counts from Census data. This resulted in the original 2006 counts being revised substantially downward (from 495 to 312 for the City of Boroondara).

Tables 10 and 11 show current homelessness counts for the City of Boroondara.

Table 10: Homelessness counts by (approximated*) Local Government Area

Area

2006 homeless count

2011 homeless count

2011 homelessness rate (per 1000 residents)

Boroondara

312

380

2.3

Maroondah

308

428

4.0

Knox

254

246

1.6

Monash

465

803

4.7

Manningham

123

209

1.8

Whitehorse

497

749

4.7

Yarra Ranges

284

335

2.3

Total Eastern Metropolitan Region

2243

3150

3.1

* Homelessness estimates are published for Statistical Area 3s (SA3s). SA3 boundaries typically align closely (but not exactly) with Local Government Area boundaries.

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics - Estimating Homelessness

Table 11: Homelessness counts by homeless operational group, City of Boroondara, 2011

Number of persons who are:

 

living in improvised dwellings, tents or sleeping out

Not published by the ABS

living in supported accommodation for the homeless

89

staying temporarily with other households

63

staying in boarding houses

Not published by the ABS

living in other temporary lodging

0

living in severely crowded dwellings

45

Total homeless persons

380

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics - Estimating Homelessness

For more information, email Research or contact Council.

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