City of Boroondara statistics covering:

  • health, including childhood health
  • drugs and alcohol
  • gambling
  • hospital visits
  • VicHealth strategic imperatives
  • national health priority areas.

This information is complemented by the City of Boroondara Community Profile, which analyses demographics for the city and its suburbs based on results from the 2011, 2006, 2001, 1996 and 1991 Censuses of Population and Housing. The profile is updated with population estimates when the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) releases new figures.

Early years health

Participation in health and development checks

In 2014-15, 1591 births were registered in Boroondara, with 49% of these to first-time mothers (782). Boroondara provides Maternal and Child Health services across 12 sites. The service provides health and developmental checks for children at 10 key stages from birth to 3.5 years. Participation rates in these checks start to drop off after the 8 week consultation (Figure 1), and just over 80% of children in the City of Boroondara participate in the 3.5 year appointment (1259). Compared to the Eastern Metropolitan Region, participation at key health and development checks is lower until 18 months

Participation in arts and cultural events - Source VicHealth - Figure 1

Figure 1: Total participation rates for key ages and stages consultations 2014-15, City of Boroondara and the Eastern Metropolitan Region (source: Department of Education and Early Childhood Development)

Breastfeeding rates

In 2014-15, just under three quarters of babies born in Boroondara were fully breastfed on discharge from hospital (72.7%), with a further 20% partially breastfed (Figure 2). At six months of age, 52.6% of babies were fully breastfed and 10.4% were partially breastfed. Across all ages, the rates of babies who were fully breastfed was higher in Boroondara than in the Eastern Metropolitan Region. In the previous five years, the proportion of infants fully breastfed at 3 months ranged from 64.4% to 66.6%. Babies fully breastfed at 6 months ranged from 51.4% to 54.1% (Table 1).

Rates of breastfeeding 2014-2015 Boroondara and Eastern Metropolitan Region - Figure 2

Figure 2: Rates of breastfeeding 2014-15, City of Boroondara and the Eastern Metropolitan Region (source: Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, Maternal and Child Health Services Annual Report, 2014-15)

Table 1 and 1a: Breastfeeding rates at 3 months and 6 months, 2010-11 to 2014-15, City of Boroondara and Eastern Metropolitan Region

 

Infants fully breastfed at 3 months

2010-11

2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
City of Boroondara

64.6%

66.6% 66.6%

65.6%

64.4%
Eastern Metropolitan Region

56.9%

58.3% 58.3% 58.3% 58.4%

 

Infants fully breastfed at 6 months

2010-11

2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
City of Boroondara

51.4%

52.5% 52.5% 54.1% 52.6%
Eastern Metropolitan Region

39.5%

40.9% 40.9% 43.1% 43.8%

Source: Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, Maternal and Child Health Services, selected Annual Reports

Children's health at school entry

The School Entrant Health Questionnaire (SEHQ) is completed by the parents or caregivers of children entering their first year of school. In Boroondara, 1484 children were involved in the 2014 SEHQ data collection. Table 2 shows the results for selected indicators and compares Boroondara results to the Metropolitan Region.

Table 2: Selected indicators of children's health when entering preparatory (prep) level 2014

General health Number in City of Boroondara in City of Boroondara % in Metropolitan region
Children reported to be in excellent or very good health

1383

93.2%

87.3%

Children reported to be overweight

29

1.9%

2.2%

Children reported to have allergies (of these children, those with an allergy action plan at school)

191 (73)

12.9% (38.3%)

11% (33.8%)

Children reported to have been told by a doctor they have asthma

(of these children, those with an asthma action plan at school)

180 (109)

12.1% (61%)

13.1% (52.7%)

Parents concerned about their children's oral health (e.g. teeth, gums)

186

12.5%

14.4%

Service use Number in City of Boroondara % in City of Boroondara % in Metropolitan region
Children reported to have seen an optometrist in the past year

314

21.1%

17.8%

Children reported to have participated in a kindergarten program led by a qualified early education teacher 1422 95.8% 89.6%
Children reported to have been seen by a a dentist in the past year 1002 67.5% 48.6%
Emotional and behavioural wellbeing Number in City of Boroondara % in City of Boroondara % in Metropolitan region
Parents concerned about the behaviour of their child 150 10.1% 12.7%
Children at high risk of developmental or behavioural problems 194 13.1% 14.8%
Children at moderate risk of developmental or behavioural problems 392 26.4% 27.1%
Family stress Number in City of Boroondara % in City of Boroondara % in Metropolitan region
Alcohol or drug problem in family 21 1.4% 3.1%
History of abuse to parent 22 1.5% 2.8%
History of abuse to child(ren) 8 0.5% 1.0%
Parent witness to violence 21 1.4% 2.7%
Child witness to violence 15 1.0% 2.7%
Gambling problem in family 9 0.6% 1.0%
History of mental illness of parent 69 4.7% 5.8%

Source: Department of Education and Childhood Development SEHQ (2014)

Australian Early Development Index

See education and training statistics

Childhood immunisation rates

In Boroondara, of the key immunisation ages, 1 year olds had the highest rate of immunisation in 2014-15 (93.1% of the target population). However, by postcode this result ranged from a low of 88.3% in postcode 3104 (Balwyn) to 98.5% in postcode 3102 (Kew East). Immunisation rates for 2 year olds ranged from 85% in 3122 (Hawthorn) to 93.5% in Ashburton. Immunisation rates for 5 year olds ranged from 88.5% in 3126 (Canterbury) to 95% in 3123 (Hawthorn).

Immunisation rates for children - Figure 3

Figure 3: Immunisation rates for children at 1 year, 2 years and 5 years, City of Boroondara postcodes 2014-15 (source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2016, Healthy Communities: Immunisation Rates for Children in 2014-15)

Hospital visits

Hospital use

The number of Boroondara residents using public hospitals decreased from 35.1% of all patients admitted to hospital in 2006-2007 to 24.1% in 2011-2012, a drop of about 5500 patients. The number of City of Boroondara residents using public hospitals in 2012-2013 was 30.3% of all patients admitted to hospital, a rise of 675 patients over the past year.

Though only accounting for 14.6% of the total population, almost half the residents that are discharged from hospital are aged over 65 years (44.9%) (Table 3). The most common cause for hospitalisation is diseases and disorders of the kidney and urinary tract, which account for 14.2% of all hospitalisations (Table 4).

Table 3: Hospital separations (discharged) by hospital type and age group 2012-13, City of Boroondara

Hospital type and age of patient

Hospital separations

% of Hospital separations

% of total population

Public hospital

20,798

30.3%

n/a

Private hospital

47,742

69.7%

n/a

Age group: 0-11

2847

4.2%

13.3%

Age group: 12-25

4935

7.2%

21.1%

Age group: 26-34

4409

6.4%

11.8%

Age group: 35-44

6945

10.1%

13.3%

Age group: 45-54

7971

11.6%

14.5%

Age group: 55-64

10,667

15.6%

11.4%

Age group: 65-74

11,418

16.7%

7.0%

Age group: 75 and over

19,348

28.2%

7.6%

Total

68,540

 

100%

Note: One patient can have multiple admitted episodes during any period

Source: Department of Health 2014, Victorian Admitted Episodes Dataset (unpublished data) and 2011 Census

Table 4: Hospital separations (discharged) by Major Diagnostic Category (MDC), City of Boroondara 2012-13

Major Diagnostic Category

Number of separations

% of separations

% Eastern Metropolitan Region

Diseases and Disorders of the Kidney and Urinary Tract

9710

14.2%

15.9%

Diseases and Disorders of the Digestive System

9046

13.2%

13.5%

Diseases and Disorders of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue

5922

8.6%

8.0%

Factors Influencing Health Status and Other Contacts with Health Services

5666

8.3%

7.0%

Neoplastic Disorders (Haematological and Solid Neoplasms)

5541

8.1%

7.5%

Diseases and Disorders of the Circulatory System

3540

5.2%

5.9%

Diseases and Disorders of the Ear Nose Mouth and Throat

3787

5.6%

4.2%

Diseases and Disorders of the Skin Subcutaneous Tissue and Breast

3159

4.6%

4.3%

Diseases and Disorders of the Eye

2968

4.3%

4.1%

Diseases and Disorders of the Nervous System

2886

4.2%

3.9%

Diseases and Disorders of the Female Reproductive System

2652

3.9%

3.4%

Pregnancy Childbirth and the Puerperium

2551

3.7%

4.1%

Diseases and Disorders of the Respiratory System

2512

3.7%

3.9%

Mental Diseases and Disorders

2007

2.9%

3.4%

Diseases and Disorders of Blood, Blood Forming Organs, Immunological Disorders

1323

1.9%

2.0%

Injuries Poisonings and Toxic Effects of Drugs

1005

1.5%

1.6%

Diseases and Disorders of the Male Reproductive System

961

1.4%

1.3%

Endocrine Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases and Disorders

806

1.2%

1.3%

Newborns and Other Neonates

766

1.1%

1.9%

Alcohol/Drug Use and Alcohol/Drug Induced Organic Mental Disorders

706

1.0%

0.7%

Diseases and Disorders of the Hepatobiliary System and Pancreas

697

1.0%

1.3%

Infectious and Parasitic Diseases Systemic or Unspecified Sites

404

0.6%

0.7%

Other/Unassignable

239

0.3%

0.0%

Total

68,540

100.0%

100%

Note: One patient can have multiple admitted episodes during any period

Source: Department of Health, Separations from Victorian hospitals by residents of the City of Boroondara and other Eastern Metropolitan Region Local Government Areas (unpublished data 2014)

Avoidable hospital admissions

Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC) are those for which hospitalisation is thought to be avoidable if preventive care and early disease management are applied. Table 5 summarises the admission rates and average bed days for the top 10 ACSC in 2013-14 for the City of Boroondara. Diabetes complications caused the most admissions to hospital and the longest average length of stay.

Of the top 10 ACSC for Boroondara in 2013-14, dental conditions, and dehydration and gastroenteritis were the only conditions that recorded higher rates of hospital admission than metropolitan Melbourne. Within the City of Boroondara, higher rates of admission for dental conditions were recorded for 5-9 year olds (6.9 per 1000 residents), 15-19 year olds (10.5 per 1000 residents), 20-24 year olds (6.2 per 1000 residents) and 85 year olds and over (5.6 per 1000 residents). Higher rates of admission for dehydration and gastroenteritis were recorded for 75-79 year olds (3.6 per 1000 residents) and 85 year olds and over (7.5 per 1000 residents).

Table 5: Top avoidable hospital admission conditions 2013-14, the City of Boroondara and metropolitan Melbourne

Condition Number of admissions Standardised rate per 1000 persons   Average bed days  

 

City of Boroondara

City of Boroondara

Metropolitan Melbourne

City of Boroondara

Metropolitan Melbourne

Diabetes complications

1571

8.5

17.8

7.7

6.6

Dental conditions

667

3.8

2.5

1.1

1.2

Iron deficiency anaemia

391

2.2

2.5

1.6

1.5

Pyelonephritis

366

2.0

2.7

5.1

3.9

Congestive cardiac failure

347

1.7

2.5

7.4

7.0

Asthma

260

1.6

1.8

2.7

1.8

Dehydration and gastoenteritis

222

1.2

0.9

1.9

2.1

Cellulitis

222

1.2

1.7

5.3

4.9

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

201

1.0

2.4

6.7

6.0

Convulsions and epilepsy

168

1.0

1.3

2.6

2.8

Source: Department of Human Services 2014, Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions reports

Drugs and alcohol

Drug and alcohol-related ambulance attendances

In 2012-13, Boroondara had a lower ambulance attendance rate than metropolitan Melbourne for all drugs. Ambulance attendances for alcohol were more than triple that of benzodiazepines, which had the second highest number of attendances. Attendances for alcohol have increased every year between 2009-10 and 2011-12 and decreased slightly between 2011-12 and 2012-13.

The greatest increase in ambulance attendance rates in Boroondara between 2008-09 and 2012-13 was in alcohol-related attendances.

Table 6: Number of drug and alcohol attendances for selected years (City of Boroondara) and rate (City of Boroondara and metropolitan Melbourne)

Drug

City of Boroondara (no. of attendances)

       

Rate per 10,000 (pop. 2012-13)

 

 

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

City of Boroondara

Metropolitan Melbourne

Alcohol

169

152

187

267

264

15.7

26.7

Benzodiazepines

86

76

79

51

77

4.6

7.5

Other analgesic

39

44

45

32

38

2.3

3.8

All heroin

35

34

34

26

24

1.4

3.4

Antidepressants

28

34

26

19

33

2.0

2.9

Antipsychotics

26

22

25

27

39

2.3

2.7

Cannabis

15

20

27

17

24

1.4

3.4

Heroin overdose

19

19

24

10

8

0.5

2.3

Other heroin

17

15

9

16

16

1.0

2.2

All amphetamines

5

9

15

15

28

1.7

3.3

Opioid analgesic

9

14

10

9

9

0.5

1.7

GHB

9

6

9

12

15

0.9

1.4

Ecstasy

16

5

<5

9

10

0.6

0.7

Other amphetamine

5

8

6

6

8

0.5

0.7

Crystal methamphetamine

<5

<5

9

9

20

1.2

2.7

Anticonvulsants

12

5

<5

<5

<5

-

0.5

Inhalant

<5

6

<5

<5

<5

-

0.3

Cocaine

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

-

0.2

Source: Lloyd, B., Matthew, S., XGao, C. 2014 Trends in alcohol and drug related ambulance attendances in Victoria: 2012-13. Fitzroy, Victoria: Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre

Alcohol-related hospital admissions

Boroondara had a higher rate of people being admitted to hospital with alcohol-related causes than the Eastern Metropolitan Region (EMR) and Victoria between 2003-04 and 2012-13. In 2012-13 in the City of Boroondara, 57.8 per 10,000 residents were admitted to hospital for alcohol-related causes compared to 51.3 per 10,000 for the EMR and 43.7 per 10,000 in Victoria.

The rate of alcohol-related admissions in Boroondara has been trending down since 2008-09 from 85.5 per 10,000.

Alcohol related hospital admission rates - Figure 4

Figure 4: Alcohol-related hospital admission rates per 10,000 resident population (source: StatPlanet: Alcohol ED Presentation Total, Turning Point, December 2014).

Electronic gaming machines

As at July 2015, Boroondara has 4 hotels and 1 club operating a total of 205 electronic gaming machines (EGMs). In 2014–15, the combined loses across all 205 EGMs was $20.9 million. Table 5 displays select indicators for City of Boroondara and rankings across all 79 Victorian Local Government Areas. Figure 3 shows the number of EGMs and combined losses for the years 1993 to 2015.

Table 5: EGM indicators and Local Government Area ranking

 

Boroondara

Ranking among Victorian Local Government Areas

Venues: 2015

5

-

EGMs: 2015

205

41

EGMs per 1,000 adults: 2014-15

1.5

70

EGM gaming losses 2014-15

$20.9 million

37

Losses per resident 18+ years: 2014-15

$151

65

Cumulative losses since 1992-93 (2015 dollars)

$494.3 million

37

Cumulative losses per adult since 1992-93 (2015 dollars)

$3564

63

% annual change in losses to 2014-15

7.9%

14

Source: City of Greater Dandenong, 2015

 

Figure 5: EGMs in the City of Boroondara 1993 to 2015. Source: City of Greater Dandenong, 2015

For more information about gambling please refer to:

VicHealth strategic imperatives

VicHealth's Action Agenda for Health Promotion 2013-2023 focuses on five strategic imperatives:

  • promoting healthy eating
  • encouraging regular physical activity
  • preventing tobacco use
  • preventing harm from alcohol
  • improving mental wellbeing.

This section assesses the health of Boroondara population against these strategic imperatives. The Victorian Population Health Survey measures the prevalence of modifiable risk factors that contribute to chronic disease and results from this survey have been used here.

VicHealth strategic imperative: promoting healthy eating

Energy dense but nutrient-poor foods contribute more than one-third of the total daily energy intake of contemporary Australians, and only 1 in 10 adults meet the recommended minimum daily intake for vegetables. As a result, 1 in 4 Victorian adults are now obese. Poor nutrition accounts for around one-sixth of the total burden of disease and costs Victoria between $1.25 and $4.15 billion every year (VicHealth 2013).

Daily intake of fruit and vegetables is used as a measure of the quality of a diet in Australia and internationally. Less than 1 in 20 people in Boroondara and Metro Melbourne eat the recommended servings of both fruit and vegetables. In Boroondara the rate of compliance with the fruit guideline is 44.7%, significantly higher than the proportion of people meeting the vegetable guidelines (5.8%).Between 2012 and 2014 the rate of people meeting the guidelines dropped in Boroondara, mainly due to the significant drop in the proportion of people meeting the fruit recommendations (see Figure 6).

Compliance with Australian fruit and vegetable guidelines - Figure 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 6: Compliance with the Australian fruit and vegetable guidelines, the City of Boroondara 2012 and 2014 (source: Department of Health)

VicHealth Strategic imperative: encourage regular physical activity

Physical activity is a major modifiable risk factor for a range of conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, Type 2 diabetes, some cancers, osteoporosis, depression and anxiety, and falls among the elderly.The Victorian Population Health Survey includes questions about the time spent on a variety of physical activities (for example walking, vigorous household chores and keep-fit exercises). The survey placed people into three categories of activity: sedentary; insufficient time and sessions; and sufficient time and sessions.

In 2014, more than half of Boroondara's residents met the criteria of sufficient exercise (55.1%), a higher proportion than for Melbourne overall (Figure 7).

Physical activity Figure 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 7: Physical activity 2014, City of Boroondara and Metropolitan Melbourne (source: Department of Health 2016)

VicHealth strategic imperative: preventing tobacco use

In 2014, 7.2% of Boroondara population was smoking, a lower rate than in Melbourne overall (12.4%). Smoking rates in the City of Boroondara have been steadily decreasing over time, dropping from 13.0 % of all residents in 2008 to 9.4% in 2011-12 and then to the latest rate of 7.4% in 2014. In the Eastern Metropolitan Region, males are more likely to be smokers than females (11.9% males smoke compared to 7.7% of females).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 8: Smoking status of City of Boroondara and metropolitan Melbourne residents, 2014 (source: Department of Health 2016)

VicHealth strategic imperative: preventing harm from alcohol

Through its links to injury, accidents, violence and more than 200 physical and mental illnesses, alcohol is one of the top 10 avoidable causes of disease and death in Victoria (VicHealth 2013). Regular, excessive consumption of alcohol places people at increased risk of chronic ill health and premature death, and episodes of heavy drinking may place the drinker (and others) at risk of injury or death.

Residents in Boroondara reported a higher increased lifetime risk and a higher increased single occasion risk of alcohol-related harm compared to Melbourne overall (Figure 9). The City of Boroondara also had higher rates of alcohol-related hospital admissions in 2012-13 compared to the Eastern region (Table 7).

Bar graph showing lifetime and single occasion of Alcohol related harm - Figure 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 9: Lifetime and single occasion risk of alcohol-related harm, 2014 (source: Department of Health 2016)

Table 7: Summary of alcohol-related harm, rates per 10,000 person

Summary of alcohol-related harm, rates per 10,000 persons (year)

Boroondara

Eastern Metropolitan Region

Victoria

Alcohol-related hospital admissions (2012-13)

57.8

51.3

43.7

Alcohol-related deaths (2010)

1.2

1.2

1.1

Alcohol-related assaults (2012-13)

3.5

6.5

15.3

Alcohol-related serious road injuries (2012-13)

2.1

2.5

4.1

Ambulance attendances where alcohol was mentioned (2012-13)

20.5

21.4

29.8

Alcohol-related courses of treatment delivered (2012-13)

13.5

18.9

27.4

Alcohol-related emergency department presentations (2012-13)

10.5

11.5

11.2

Alcohol-related family violence incidents (2012-13)

8.1

14.0

26.7

Source: StatPlanet, Turning Point, December 2014

VicHealth Strategic imperative: improving mental wellbeing

Psychological distress is an important risk factor of heavy drinking, smoking and drug use. It has also been directly linked to several diseases and conditions such as fatigue, migraine, cardiovascular diseases, injury, obesity, depression and anxiety (VicHealth 2016).

A measure of psychological distress, the Kessler 10 Psychological Distress Scale (K10) has been included in the Victorian Population Health Survey to assess levels of psychological distress within 4 categories - low, moderate, high, and very high.

Most (70.3%) of Boroondara residents reported having low levels of psychological distress, a higher proportion than across Metropolitan Melbourne (61%) but 17.4% of residents reported moderate levels of psychological distress and 10.5% high or very high levels of psychological distress (see Figure 10).

Percentage of population registered with National Diabetes Services Scheme - Figure 10

Figure 10: Psychological distress level 2014 (source: Department of Health 2016)

National health priority areas

The diseases and conditions listed as a National Health Priority Area (NHPA) are included here because they are significant contributors to the cost and burden of illness and injury in Australia. A focus on these diseases and conditions can make significant gains in the health of Australia’s population. This section looks at the incidence of these diseases and conditions in the Boroondara population.

National health priority area: cancer control

In 2011, Australia was ranked 23 among 35 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries for average cancer mortality rates (197.7 per 100,000). In Australia, average cancer mortality rates were higher for men (251.3 per 100,000) than women (156.2 per 100,000).

In Boroondara, there has been an average of 866 cases of malignant cancers diagnosed each year between 2010 and 2013, with more males being diagnosed (451 cases compared to 415 for females). There is a lower rate of cancer in the City of Boroondara for males compared to Victoria, however, there is a higher rate of cancer in the City of Boroondara for females compared to Victoria. The annual average new cases of cancer diagnosis from 2010 to 2013 are displayed in tables 8 and 9.

Table 8: Malignant cancers diagnosed each year in the City of Boroondara, 2010-13

 

Average no. City of Boroondara cases

% of Victorian cases in City of Boroondara

City of Boroondara rate per 10,000 residents

Victoria rate per 10,000 residents
Total

866

3.0%

51.5

52.5

Males

451

2.8%

55.5

58.3

Females

415

3.1%

47.8

46.8

Source: Victorian Cancer Council 2015 (unpublished data) and ABS Population by Age and Sex 2014

Table 9: Average diagnoses per year in the City of Boroondara of the leading cancers in Victoria, 2010-13

Type of cancer

No. City of Boroondara cases

% of Victorian cases in the City of Boroondara

Prostate

150

3.2%

Breast

132

3.5%

Bowel

110

2.9%

Melanoma

71

3.2%

Lung

58

2.2%

National health priority area: cardiovascular healthSource: Victorian Cancer Council 2015 (unpublished data) and ABS Population by Age and Sex 2014

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes all diseases and conditions of the heart and blood vessels. The main types of CVD in Australia are coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and cardiomyopathy, acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease and congenital heart disease.

In 2012-13 in Boroondara, there were 3540 admissions to hospital for diseases of the circulatory system (the major diagnosis category that includes all cardiovascular issues). This accounted for 5.2% of all hospital admissions by residents for that year (Department of Health 2014, unpublished data).

There are also risk factors for heart disease which can be looked at in the population (Table 10). Boroondara compares favourably to Victoria on all these risk factor measures. Notably, between 2008 and 2011-12 (the two Victorian Population Health Surveys), the City of Boroondara improved in smoking rates (-4.2% points), however increased in the rate of being obese or overweight (+2.3% points).

Table 10: Rate of selected risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the City of Boroondara community

Risk factor

City of Boroondara

   

Metropolitan Melbourne

 

 

2008

2011-12

2014

2014

Current smoking

13.6%

9.4%

7.2%

12.4%

Obese or overweight

32.1%

34.4%

36.8%

48.6%

Does not meet fruit guidelines

46.1%

46.4%

55.3%

52%

Does not meet vegetable guidelines

90.4%

92.0%

94.2%

94.1%

Does not meet fruit or vegetable guidelines

42.4%

43.5%

53.5%

48.4%

Sedentary or insufficient exercise

na

na

43.6%

54.1%

Source: Department of Health 2013, Victorian Population Health Survey 2011-12

National health priority area: injury prevention and control

Refer to the crime and safety statistics page for information on injury.

National health priority area: mental health

Refer to the section 'VicHealth Strategic imperative: improving mental wellbeing' above.

National health priority area: Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes is Australia's fastest growing chronic disease and for every person diagnosed it is estimated that there is another who is not yet diagnosed (Diabetes Australia, 2013).

In June 2015, 2.9% of Boroondara population (5194 residents) were registered with the National Diabetes Services Scheme with 88.6% of these with a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. The City of Boroondara was ranked fifth out of all Victorian Local Government Areas for the lowest percentage of the population registered with the National Diabetes Services Scheme.

Percentage of population registered with National Diabetes Services Scheme - Figure 10

Figure 11: Percentage of population group that is registered with the National Diabetes Services Scheme, June 2015 (National Diabetes Services Scheme, 2015)

In Boroondara, diabetes complications caused the longest length of stay in hospital for avoidable hospitalisation conditions, with an average of 7.7 bed days per admission in 2013-14. The rate of admission per 1000 residents increases with age with 63.0 per 1000 residents aged 80 to 84 hospitalised with diabetes complications in the City of Boroondara (Department of Human Services). Boroondara compares well against Victoria for selected risk factors of Type 2 diabetes. However, there is a higher prevalence in the City of Boroondara of sitting for 7 hours or more a day (Table 11).

Table 11: Rate of selected risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes in the City of Boroondara community

Risk factor

City of Boroondara

 

Victoria measure

 

 

2008

2011-12

2011-12

Obese or overweight

32.1%

34.4%

49.8%

Sedentary or insufficient exercise

29.8%

28.3%

32.1%

Sitting for seven hours a day

45.9%

na

32.6%

Source: Department of Health 2013, Victorian Population Health Survey 2011-12

National health priority area: asthma

Asthma is associated with a substantial impact on the community. A large proportion of the burden of asthma is attributed to young people (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare).

Findings from the 2013 School Entrant Health Questionnaire show that 194 students starting prep that year in Boroondara (11.9%) were told by a doctor that they have asthma. This is lower than the Eastern Region rate of 12.9%. Over half of these students had an asthma action plan at school (105 students, or 54.2%), slightly lower than the Eastern Metropolitan Region rate where 54.5% of asthmatics have an action plan.

In the Victorian Population Health Survey 2011-12, 10.8% of Boroondara respondents reported they had been told by their doctor that they displayed symptoms of asthma in the previous 12 months, compared to 10.9% in Victoria. In Victoria, the prevalence of asthma was significantly higher in women (12.4%) compared with men (9.4%). The opposite trend was observed in Boroondara with 12.9% of males and 8.5% of female respondents reporting asthma in the previous 12 months.

National health priority area: arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions

In 2012, it was estimated that a quarter of Australia's population (26.9%) had arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions, with more women than men (31.6% compared to 22.2%) affected. While prevalence rates are higher in older Australians, more than half of those with musculoskeletal conditions (58.4%) are between the ages of 25 and 64 years – the prime working age population. Arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions are more prevalent than any other National Health Priority Area.

In Boroondara, the major diagnosis category Diseases and Disorders of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue had the third highest rate of admission to hospital with 5922 residents being admitted to hospital with a condition of this type (8.6% of all admissions in 2012-13) (Department of Health 2014, unpublished data).

National health priority area: obesity

The prevalence of overweight and obesity has increased over time. Australia’s adult obesity rate is now fourth highest among OECD countries and recent studies suggest that overweight and obesity may be overtaking tobacco as the leading cause of burden of disease in Australia (OECD Health at a Glance 2015).

The Victorian Population Health Survey 2011-12 found that 50% of Victorians are overweight or obese equating to approximately 2.1 million Victorians aged 18–75 years. Boroondara residents' data was statistically significantly more favourable, with 36.8% of residents classified as overweight or obese.

National health priority area: dementia

Consistent with Australian trends, Boroondara will experience an ageing of the population in the coming years. Research shows that the increase in age-related dementia will occur in communities right across Australia. In Boroondara, the number of people living with dementia is forecast to increase from 3334 residents in 2016 to 8817 in 2050, an increase of 164% (Alzheimer's Australia Victoria, 2016).

In 2015, the 10 Local Government Areas with the highest prevalence are (in order):

  1. Greater Geelong
  2. Mornington Peninsula
  3. Monash
  4. Whitehorse
  5. Boroondara
  6. Moonee Valley
  7. Moreland
  8. Glen Eira
  9. Kingston
  10. Darebin

By 2050, the 10 Local Government Areas with the highest prevalence will be (in order):

  1. Greater Geelong
  2. Mornington Peninsula
  3. Casey
  4. Monash
  5. Whitehorse
  6. Brimbank
  7. Boroondara
  8. Knox
  9. Manningham
  10. Greater Dandenong

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