City of Boroondara statistics covering:

This information is complemented by the City of Boroondara Community Profile, which analyses demographics for the City and its suburbs based on results from the ABS Census of Population and Housing. 

Country of birth

The percentage of Boroondara residents born overseas has increased by about 11% over 25 years and in 2016, 31.2% of the population was born overseas. Most residents born overseas were from non-English speaking countries (24.0% of Boroondara's residents).

The City's overseas-born population originated from more than 150 different countries. The main overseas countries of birth in 2016 were China (6.6% of the Boroondara's residents), the United Kingdom (3.5% of the Boroondara's residents), India (2.4% of the Boroondara's residents), Malaysia (2.0% of the Boroondara's residents), New Zealand (1.6% of the Boroondara's residents) and Vietnam (1.2% of the Boroondara's residents). The largest increase in birthplace countries between 2011 and 2016 were China, Vietnam, India, and Malaysia.

Table 1: Percentage of overseas born residents, City of Boroondara and the Metropolitan Region, selected years (Source: ABS, 1996 to 2016 Censuses). 

Birthplace

Area

% of residents 1996

% of residents 2001

% of residents 2006

% of residents 2011

% of residents 2016

Total overseas born

Boroondara

24.1

24.3

25.8

28.4

31.2

Greater Melbourne

29.1

28.2

28.7

31.5

33.9

Non-English speaking backgrounds

Boroondara

16.6

17.0

18.7

21.0

24.3

Greater Melbourne

21.6

21.0

21.7

24.3

27.1

Within the top 10 overseas countries of birth, residents born in Asian countries tend to be younger, for example people aged 20 to 39 accounted for 58.2% of Indian-,  38.6% of Sri Lankan-, 38.1% of Vietnamese- and 36.0% of Chinese-born residents in Boroondara. Residents born in European countries tend to be older, for example, people aged 60 years and over account for 79.2% of Greek-, 77.4% of Italian- and 33.4% of English-born residents in Boroondara.

For more information on country of birth, see the birthplace page on the City of Boroondara Community Profile. 

Language spoken

In line with the increase in overseas born residents in Boroondara, the percentage of residents who spoke a language other than English increased across each census period. In 2006, 20.8% of residents spoke a language other than English at home. This increased to 23.5% and 27.2% in 2011 and 2016 respectively. The top five languages spoken by the residents in 2016 include two Chinese languages (Mandarin (8.2%) and Cantonese (3.0%)), followed by Greek (2.8%), Italian (1.7%) and Vietnamese (1.2%).

Further breakdown of the 2016 Census results for the common non-English language speakers show variations across different age groups. 

Figure 1 shows The chart shows that in the 2016 Census, Chinese languages were commonly spoken by residents aged under 50 years whereas Italian and Greek languages had relatively stable patterns across all age groups, except the age group 45-49 years where a higher number of residents spoke Greek or Italian.

Figure 1: Number of residents who speak a selected language, by age group, City of Boroondara (Source: ABS, 2016 Census).

Figure 1 shows the number of people in each age group that speak a Chinese language (either Mandarin or Cantonese), Greek, or Italian  - the three main languages (other than English) spoken in Boroondara. The chart shows that in the 2016 Census, Chinese languages were commonly spoken by residents aged under 50 years whereas Italian and Greek languages had relatively stable patterns across all age groups, except the age group 45-49 years where a higher number of residents spoke Greek or Italian. This is a reflection of migration trends.

Most residents in Boroondara who speak a language other than English at home were proficient in spoken English: 77.4% of Chinese language speakers, 87.7% of Greek speakers and 90.7% of Italian speakers report that they speak English 'very well' or 'well'.

Figure 2 shows that older adults in Boroondara are more likely to report that they do not speak English well.

Figure 2: Percentage of persons who spoke another language and spoke English at home ‘not well or not at all’, by age group, City of Boroondara (Source: ABS, 2016 Census)

Figure 2 shows the percentage of residents in each age group who spoke another language and who reported that they spoke English ‘not well or ‘not at all’. There appears to be a relationship between age and proficiency in spoken English among residents in Boroondara who speak a language other than English with older adults more likely to speak English 'not well' or 'not at all'. 

For more information about language spoken see the languages page on the City of Boroondara Community Profile. 

Arrival in Australia

The 2016 census indicated that more than one-third (36.8%) of Boroondara residents born overseas had arrived in Australia over the last 10 years.

Figure 3 shows More than 70% of overseas born residents arrived in the past 30 years (between 1986 and 2015), with the highest number of arrivals being reported in 2015 when 2,902 people (36.7% residents born overseas) arrived.

 

Figure 3: Year of arrival of current Boroondara residents who were born overseas, 1950 to 2015 (Source: ABS, 2016 Census)

Figure 3 shows the historic trend for the arrival year of overseas born residents with the number of people that arrived each year between 1950 and 2015 being displayed. More than 70% of overseas born residents arrived in the past 30 years (between 1986 and 2015), with the highest number of arrivals being reported in 2015 when 2,902 people (36.7% residents born overseas) arrived.  There was also a peak in 1989 of 1186 arrivals.

Boroondara residents who arrived in Australia before 2001 were more likely to be born in the United Kingdom, Greece, Italy and Malaysia. Those who arrived in Australia between 2001 and 2016 were predominantly born in China (excluding Special Administrative Regions and Taiwan), the United Kingdom, India, Malaysia and New Zealand. 

Citizenship

Each year, ceremonies are held to welcome new Australian citizens. Throughout 2016-17, Boroondara held 8 citizenship ceremonies and welcomed 1076 new Australian citizens. Table 2 shows the number of new Australian citizens welcomed each quarter in the City of Boroondara between 2015-16 and 2016-17.

Table 2: Number of new citizens declared, City of Boroondara during 2015-16 and 2016-17 (Source: City of Boroondara)

Period

2015-16

2016-17

Quarter 1

129

385

Quarter 2

308

138

Quarter 3

406

265

Quarter 4

225

288

Annual total

1,068

1,076

Indigenous residents 

A total of 314 Boroondara residents identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander in the 2016 Census, of which 293 identified as Aboriginal and 21 identified as either Torres Strait Islander or both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.  The indigenous residents are generally younger than the non-Indigenous population. The 2016 census (as shown in Table 5), indicates that the majority (58%) of indigenous population group were younger than 30 years old compared to non-indigenous (39.8%).

Table 3: Percentage of Indigenous and non-Indigenous population by age group, City of Boroondara, (Source: ABS, 2016 Census)

Age group (in years)

Indigenous

Non Indigenous

0-9

12.8%

10.7%

10-19

20.2%

13.9%

20-29

25.0%

15.2%

30-39

12.5%

12.0%

40-49

11.2%

14.0%

50-59

8.0%

13.2%

60-69

6.7%

10.0%

70+

3.5%

11.1%

The median individual and household income for the indigenous population is lower than non-indigenous population (see Table 4).

Table 4: Indigenous and non-Indigenous selected medians and averages, City of Boroondara, (Source: ABS, 2016 Census)

 

Indigenous person or household with Indigenous persons

Non-Indigenous person or other households

Median age

26

38

Median weekly individual income

$548

$870

Median weekly household income

$1933

$2083

Average household size

2.7

2.6

 

Religion 

Figure 4 shows the percentage of the Boroondara population that reported being a Christian or who had no religion at each Census year since 2001

At the 2016 Census, 45.9% of Boroondara's population identified as Christian whereas 37.1% indicated that they have no religious affiliation. Between the 2001 and 2016 censuses, there was a 17% decrease in those reporting being Christian and an 18.1% increase in people reporting they have no religion

Figure 4: Christianity and no religion comparison, 2001 to 2016 Censuses (Source: ABS, 2001 to 2016 Censuses)

At the 2016 Census, 45.9% of Boroondara's population identified as Christian whereas 37.1% indicated that they have no religious affiliation. Between the 2001 and 2016 censuses, there was a 17% decrease in those reporting being Christian and an 18.1% increase in people reporting they have no religion (see Figure 7).

Figure 5 shows the comparison between having a religion and no religion by age group. Residents aged 20-29 years were more likely to report having no religion, while all other age groups were more likely to report a religious affiliation.

Residents aged 20-29 years were more likely to report having no religion, while all other age groups were more likely to report a religious affiliation.

Figure 5:  Percentage of residents that reported having a religion and who reported no religion, by age group (Source: ABS, 2016 Census)

More information on Boroondara's religious profile can be found on the religion page of the City of Boroondara Community Profile. 

Attitudes to cultural diversity

Attitudes to cultural diversity were measured in the Victorian Population Health Survey 2014. Respondents were asked if multiculturalism makes life in the area better.

Nearly three-quarters (73.2%) of Boroondara residents responded 'yes, definitely', which was higher than the rate of those that answered ‘yes, definitely’ in both the Eastern Metropolitan Region (60.7%) and Victoria overall (55.4%). 

People with a disability

According to the 2016 Census, 6,403 people (2,483 males, 3,920 females) in Boroondara require assistance with core activities due to a severe or profound disability, representing 3.8% of the Boroondara population. This is 1.1 per cent lower than metropolitan Melbourne (where 4.9% of residents require daily assistance with core activities).

Seventeen per cent of those with a disability (1,072 Boroondara residents) live alone. Sixty-five per cent of Boroondara residents requiring assistance are aged 70 years and over, and 9% are aged under 20 years. The number of Boroondara residents with a disability is projected to increase by 1,240 people between 2018 and 2028. Just over ninety per cent of this increase (1,131 people) will be people aged 70 years and over who have a disability.

These figures are based on the Census definition of profound or severe disability, which measures the number of people who report that they need assistance in one or more of three core activity areas (self-care, mobility and communication) because of a disability, long-term health condition or old age. This definition does not include people living with a disability who do not require carer assistance, such as community members who use a wheelchair or scooter or who have a vision or hearing impairment and live independently.

Extrapolating from the 2015 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers by Australian Bureau of Statistics, which adopts a much broader definition of disability than applied in the Census, it can be estimated that 33,600 people  or nearly 1 in 5 Boroondara residents) have a disability. Further extrapolation indicates that 11,800 (6.8% of Boroondara residents) have profound or severe limitations to communication, mobility and/or self-care activities 15,300 (8.8% of Boroondara residents) have moderate or mild limitations to communication, mobility or self-care activities 15,800 (9.0% of Boroondara residents) have schooling or employment limitations. The number of people with a disability is expected to increase with the ageing population.

Carers of people with a disability

See our work and economic resources and statistics page and social exclusion and disadvantage page.

 

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