City of Boroondara statistics covering:

  • paid and unpaid work (volunteering)
  • work-life balance
  • place of work
  • income
  • pensions
  • businesses.

This page is designed to complement the information available from our City of Boroondara Economic Profile.

Employment status

At the 2011 Census, Boroondara's resident labour force (that is, people aged over 15 years who are employed or who are unemployed and looking for work) was 84,058 people (52.8% of the resident population count). Information about the City of Boroondara residents' labour force status is available from our employment status page on the City of Boroondara Community Profile. Information about trends in unemployment among the Boroondara's residents is available from our unemployment page on the City of Boroondara Community Profile.

Females are less likely to work full-time and more likely to work part-time or to not be in the labour force at almost all ages (Figures 1 through 3).

City of Boroondara residents who worked full-time by age group and gender Census 2011 - Figure 1

Figure 1: City of Boroondara residents who worked full-time by age group and gender, Census 2011 (source: 2011 Census - Basic Community Profile (Boroondara)

City of Boroondara residents who worked part-time by age group and gender Census 2011 - Figure 2

Figure 2: City of Boroondara residents who worked part-time by age group and gender, Census 2011 (source: 2011 Census - Basic Community Profile (Boroondara))

City of Boroondara residents not in the labor force by age group and gender Census 2011 - Figure 3

Figure 3: City of Boroondara residents not in the labour force by age group and gender, Census 2011 (source: 2011 Census - Basic Community Profile (Boroondara))

Work-life balance

At the 2011 Census, the proportion of full-time employed Boroondara residents who worked 50 or more hours in the week prior to the Census was 38.7% for men and 22.4% for women. According to the VicHealth Indicators Survey 2011:

  • 5.5% of residents commute more than 2 hours per day (compared to 11.6% for Victoria)
  • 25.1% of residents lack time for family and friends (compared to 27.4% for Victoria)
  • 63.8% of employed residents report that they do not experience a work-life balance conflict (compared to 53.1% for the Eastern Metropolitan Region).

This suggests that Boroondara's residents were less likely to be experiencing difficulties balancing their work–life commitments. Further information is presented in Figures 4 and 5.

Employed City of Boroondara residents who disagree that work and family interfere 2011 - Figure 5

Figure 4: Employed City of Boroondara residents who disagree that work and family life often interfere with each other by gender, 2011 (source: Community Indicators Victoria - customised live report)

Employed City of Boroondara residents who disagree that work and family interfere 2011 - Figure 5

Figure 5: Employed City of Boroondara residents who disagree that work and family life often interfere with each other by age group, 2011 (source: Community Indicators Victoria - customised live report)

Residents' place of work and Boroondara's workforce place of residence

Just over a quarter of employed Boroondara residents work within the City of Boroondara and just under a quarter work within the City of Melbourne. Further information on where Boroondara residents work is available via the residents' place of work page of the City of Boroondara Community Profile.

At the 2011 Census, 61,946 people reported that they worked in Boroondara, 2653 more people than at the 2006 Census. Further information on people who work in Boroondara is available via the workers' place of residence page of the City of Boroondara Community Profile.

Industry of employment and occupations

The industry most represented in Boroondara's workforce is professional, scientific and technical services (Figure 6). During the 5 years between 2006 and 2011, the largest increase was in the health care and social assistance industry (an extra 1097 workers) and the largest decrease was in the public administration and safety industry (a reduction of 893 workers).

Almost half of the Boroondara labour force was employed across 4 industries:

  • professional, scientific and technical services
  • health care and social assistance
  • education and training
  • retail trade.
People who work in the City of Boroondara by industry of employment Census 2011 - Working Population Profile - Figure 6

Figure 6: People who work in the City of Boroondara by industry of employment, Census 2011 (source: 2011 Census - Working Population Profile (Boroondara))

More information on the City of Boroondara's workforce characteristics is available under 'workforce profiles' at our Economy .id website.

At the 2011 Census, more than half of the Boroondara labour force was employed in managerial roles or as professionals (with the top 3 professions being accounting, nursing and secondary school teaching). Further information on the City of Boroondara residents' occupations and the industries in which they work is available via our occupations page.

Businesses and business owners

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), there were 23,147 actively trading businesses in Boroondara at June 2015. Almost half (48.4%) were in the following 3 industries:

  • professional, scientific and technical services
  • rental, hiring and real estate services
  • financial and insurance services.

Income

Boroondara is an affluent area, with 45.2% of households having a weekly income in the top quartile for Victoria (at the 2011 Census). Nonetheless, 9% of households had an income less than $400 per week.

Hawthorn has a high proportion of households with an income less than $400 per week but a relatively high average taxable income (Figure 7 and Table 1). This may be due to the large number of university students who reside in Hawthorn and who may not attract income tax. Glen Iris has relatively few households with an income less than $400 per week and moderate average taxable income, possibly because there are relatively few medium and high density (lower cost) dwellings in these suburbs, so less variation in socio-economic circumstances.

Figure 7: Proportion of households with a weekly income less than $400, by suburb, 2011 Census (source: 2011 Census - Place of Enumeration Profile (Boroondara))

Further information on household and individual income is available under 'what do we do' and then 'income' at our Profile .id.

Unpaid work and unpaid care

Unpaid domestic work includes food or drink preparation and cleaning, laundry, gardening, home maintenance and repairs, and household shopping and finance management. Information about unpaid domestic work is collected for people aged 15 years and over in the Census.

According to the 2011 Census, both genders were equally likely to have done between 5 and 14 hours of unpaid domestic work during the week prior to Census night 2011. Females were more likely to have done more than 14 hours and males were more likely to have done less than 5 hours (Figure 8).

Unpaid domestic work performed by City of Boroondara residents by age group - 2011 Census - Figure 9

Figure 8: Unpaid domestic work performed by City of Boroondara residents by gender, 2011 Census (source: 2011 Census - Basic Community Profile (Boroondara))

The proportion of residents doing 15 or more hours of unpaid domestic work increases with age to the mid-30s and declines again after the mid-80s (Figure 9).

Figure 9: Unpaid domestic work performed by City of Boroondara residents by age group, 2011 Census (source: 2011 Census - Basic Community Profile (Boroondara))

In general, females were more likely to have spent time caring for a child or children (under 15 years) without pay in the 2 weeks prior to Census night 2011 (Figure 10). One exception is the 45 to 54 age group. This inconsistency is also apparent (although less pronounced) for Melbourne. This is also the age group at which almost 1 in 4 women provide unpaid assistance to someone with a disability, long-term illness or problems related to old age (Figure 11).

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Figure 10: Unpaid childcare provided by City of Boroondara residents by age group and gender, 2011 Census (source: 2011 Census - Basic Community Profile (Boroondara))

In general, females were more likely to have spent time providing unpaid care, help or assistance to someone with a disability, a long-term illness or problems related to old age during the 2 weeks prior to Census night 2011 (Figure 11).

Unpaid care provided by City of Boroondara residents by age group and gender 2011 - Census - Figure 11

Figure 11: Unpaid care provided by City of Boroondara residents by age group and gender, 2011 Census (source: 2011 Census - Basic Community Profile (Boroondara))

Volunteering

Almost a quarter of Boroondara residents aged 15 years or over reported that they had done unpaid voluntary work through an organisation or group in the 12 months prior to Census night 2011. The VicHealth Indicators Survey 2011 showed 41.9% of Boroondara residents reported that they participate in unpaid voluntary work at least once a month (Figure 12).

The difference between the Census and the VicHealth findings may be partly due to the different questions asked. Even though the VicHealth Indicators Survey 2011 results are restricted to frequent volunteer work and the Census results are not, the VicHealth question does not specify 'through an organisation or group'. People who, for example, assist elderly neighbours, friends or relatives with household tasks may report in response to the VicHealth survey that they do volunteer work, but this would not qualify as volunteer work according to the definition provided on the Census household form (unless the assistance was organised through an organisation or group).

The differing sampling process probably also had an impact on the results. The VicHealth Indicators Survey 2011 included a sample of approximately 300 Boroondara residents (aged 18 years and over), while the Census is designed to capture all residents (and sought volunteering information from people aged 15 years and over).

Figure 12: City of Boroondara and Eastern Metropolitan Region residents who volunteer, 2011 Census and 2011 VicHealth (source: 2011 Census - Basic Community Profile (Boroondara) and Community Indicators Victoria - customised live report)

According to the Census, the group most likely to report being a volunteer are women aged 40 to 49 years. The group least likely to report being a volunteer are women aged 85 years and over, but for all other age groups, males were less likely to report being volunteers (Figure 13).

Proportion of City of Boroondara residents who volunteer by age group and gender 2011 Census - Figure 13

Figure 13: Proportion of City of Boroondara residents who volunteer by age group and gender, 2011 Census (source: 2011 Census - Basic Community Profile (Boroondara))

Economic disadvantage

The Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage is based on Census data relating to variables such as dwellings with no internet connection, English proficiency, low-income households, households renting from government, unemployment, one-parent families, people with a long-term health condition or disability, and people with no post-school qualifications. See cultural diversity statistics for more information.

The number of people who receive a Department of Social Services payment (see Table 1) can be used as an indicator of disadvantage in the community and/or an ageing population.

Table 1: Centrelink pension recipients (selected, City of Boroondara, December 2013 and December 2015, selected payment types)

Payment types

No. of recipients

2013

No. of recipients

2015

Age pension

10,235

10,275

Carer allowance

2137

2167

Carer payment

394

395

Commonwealth Seniors Health Card

4677

4736

Disability Support Pension

2280

2221

Family Tax Benefit A

3855

3551

Family Tax Benefit B

3477

2797

Health Care Card

6694

6064

Low Income Card

3279

3136

Newstart Allowance

1754

1640

Pensioner Concession Card

13,751

13,786

Youth Allowance (student and apprentice)

1915

1739

Source: Department of Social Services Payment Demographic Data

For more information, email Research or contact Council.