This page provides data on key education and training indicators for the City of Boroondara, including primary schools, secondary schools, and apprenticeships and traineeships.

This information is complemented by the City of Boroondara Community Profile, which analyses demographics for the City and its suburbs based on results from the ABS Census of Population and Housing. 

See the Boroondara Community Profile page for more information about:

Kindergarten facilities and enrolments

In Boroondara, 74 kindergartens and long day care centres provide funded 4-year-old kindergarten program places. Thirty-eight kindergartens are community managed and 36 are privately managed, including kindergartens attached to private schools.

The Boroondara Kindergarten Central Enrolment Scheme (BKCES) is a Council operated enrolment scheme for 24 community managed kindergartens. In 2020, 647 3-year-old places and 1,001 4-year-old places were available at these kindergartens. Total number of available places in 2021 will increase to 1,684 places with 709 3-year-old places and 975 4-year-old places.  

Table 1: Number of 3 and 4-year-old kindergarten places available through the Boroondara Kindergarten Central Enrolment Scheme, 2019, 2020 and 2021 (Source: City of Boroondara, 2020)

Age Level kindergarten

2019

2020

2021

3-year-old

730

647

709

4-year-old

1,031

1,001

975

Total

1,761

1,648

1,684

Australian Early Development Census 

The Australian Early Development Census (AEDC) is a measure of how children are developing in five development domains by the time they reach school age. The survey has been conducted in 2009, 2012, 2015 and 2018. In 2018, surveys were completed by teachers for 1,847 children living in Boroondara and in their first year of primary school. 

Boroondara had a lower percentage of children considered developmentally vulnerable in all domains compared to Victoria. Compared to the 2015 results, there was a decrease in children considered developmentally on-track in the domains of physical health and wellbeing and communication skills and general knowledge.

However, there was an increase of children considered developmentally on-track in the domain of emotional maturity in Boroondara. There was also a significant decrease in children developmentally at risk in the emotional maturity domain.

Table 2: Percentage of children in Boroondara who were developmentally on track, at risk, or vulnerable in each of the five AEDC domains (Source: Australian Early Development Census 2018)

Developmentally on track

2015

2018

Change

2015 to 2018

Physical health and wellbeing

87%

85.1%

Significant decrease

Social competence

85.6%

84.5%

No significant change

Emotional maturity

82.5%

84.6%

Significant increase

Language and cognitive skills (school-based)

92.8%

92.6%

No significant change

Communication skills and general knowledge

87.1%

85.5%

Significant decrease

Developmentally at risk

2015

2018

Change

2015 to 2018

Physical health and wellbeing

8.7%

10.1%

No significant change

Social competence

10.1%

10.7%

No significant change

Emotional maturity

12.8%

10.3%

Significant decrease

Language and cognitive skills (school-based)

5.5%

5.6%

No significant change

Communication skills and general knowledge

8.9%

9.7%

No significant change

Developmentally vulnerable

2015

2018

Change

2015 to 2018

Physical health and wellbeing

4.3%

4.9%

No significant change

Social competence

4.2%

4.8%

No significant change

Emotional maturity

4.8%

5.1%

No significant change

Language and cognitive skills (school-based)

1.7%

1.8%

No significant change

Communication skills and general knowledge

4%

4.8%

No significant change

 

Special education schools

There are five special education schools in Boroondara:

  1. Belmore School provides education to students aged 5 to 18 years with a physical disability or health impairment.
  2. Rossbourne School caters to students aged 12 to 17 years who have a diagnosed learning difficulty and experience difficulties in mainstream education.
  3. Andale School is an independent school for primary school-aged children with language and learning disorders who are not able to learn effectively in the mainstream setting.
  4. St Paul's College is a specialist school for children aged 5 to 18 years with a wide range of needs including intellectual, physical, profound multiple and sensory disabilities including autism and complex medical needs.
  5. Giant Steps, Melbourne opened in Kew in 2016 and caters to students with Autism. 

Primary schools

Boroondara is home to 46 primary schools including 12 prep to Year 12 (P-12) schools. Twenty-one primary schools are government run and 24 are independent. Table 3 shows the number and type of primary schools in each of the City's suburbs. 

Table 3: Primary schools in the City of Boroondara, by suburb (Source: City of Boroondara, 2020)

Suburb

Government

Independent

Total primary schools

Ashburton

2

1

3

Balwyn

3

1

4

Balwyn North

4

2

6

Camberwell

2

1

3

Canterbury

1

3

4

Deepdene

-

1

1

Glen Iris

2

1

3

Hawthorn

3

3

6

Hawthorn East

1

1

2

Kew

1

9

10

Kew East

1

1

2

Surrey Hills

1

1

2

Total

21

25

46

Secondary schools 

Boroondara is home to 24 secondary schools (including 12 prep to Year 12 schools (P-12) schools) comprised of six government secondary schools and 18 independent secondary schools. Table 4 shows the number and type of secondary schools in each of the City's suburbs.

Table 4: Secondary schools in the City of Boroondara, by suburb (Source: City of Boroondara, 2020)

Suburb

Government

Independent

Total  secondary schools

Ashburton

1

0

1

Balwyn

2

1

3

Balwyn North

0

0

0

Camberwell

0

1

1

Canterbury

1

4

5

Deepdene

0

0

0

East Hawthorn

1

2

3

Glen Iris

0

0

0

Hawthorn

1

2

3

Kew

0

7

7

Kew East

0

1

1

Surrey Hills

0

0

0

Total

6

18

24

International secondary school students 

The Department of Education and Training is responsible for the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS). Only education institutions registered under the Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS) Act and listed on CRICOS can enrol overseas students to study in Australia on a student visa.

In 2018, 15 of the 24 secondary schools (including nine P-12 schools) in Boroondara were registered to accept international students. 

School transition

On Track is a Victorian Government initiative designed to ensure that students in Years 10 to 12 are on a pathway for further education, training or employment after leaving school.

In Boroondara, more than three quarters of students who graduated Year 12 in 2019 had moved on to university to undertake a Bachelor degree (80.6%).

Compared to Victoria, Boroondara has a higher percentage of Year 12 or equivalent completers going on to Bachelor degrees (80.6% compared to 54.1%) and a lower percentage going on to apprenticeships/traineeships (2.5% compared to 8.2%), and employment (8.7% compared to 19.7%).

Table 5: Destinations of Year 12 or equivalent completers six months after leaving school, City of Boroondara (Source: Department of Education and Training

Post-School Destination

2017

2019

Victoria 2019

Bachelor degree

77.8%

80.6%

54.1%

Certificates/diplomas

6.6%

6%

12.8%

Apprenticeships/traineeships

2.6%

2.5%

8.2%

Employed

10.1%

8.7%

19.7%

Looking for work

2.0%

2.0%

4.4%

Not in the labour force, employment or training

0.9%

np

0.8%

Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning and Vocational Education and Training subjects 

The Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) and Vocational Education and Training (VET) subjects are alternatives to the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE).

Like the VCE, VCAL is a registered senior qualification. However, while VCE is widely used as a pathway to university, VCAL offers a more practical learning experience. Students who complete their VCAL are more likely to be interested in attending TAFE, starting an apprenticeship or getting a job after completing Year 12. 

VET programs are generally completed over one or two years and provide a qualification or partial completion of a Certificate II or III. The courses often include on-the-job learning. VET programs contribute to VCE and most contribute towards a study score that counts towards the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank. 

For information about individual school VET enrolments see the My School website by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. 

Apprenticeships and traineeships

Apprenticeships and traineeships combine paid work and structured training. Traineeships generally take between 12 to 24 months to complete and apprenticeships generally last between 36 to 48 months.

In 2019, the most popular occupations for apprentices and trainees were vocational education teachers (465), health and welfare support workers (315) and hospitality workers (290). Table 6 displays the full list of most popular occupations. 

Table 6: Number of program enrolments for 10 popular occupations in 2019, City of Boroondara (Source:National Centre for Vocational Education Research)

Occupations

Number of enrolments

Vocational education teachers

465

Health and welfare support workers (not further defined)

315

Hospitality workers (not further defined)

290

Welfare support workers

255

Performing arts technicians

255

Child carers

250

Deck and fishing hands

230

Bookkeepers

195

Construction managers

190

Nursing support and personal care workers

190

Table 7: Estimated apprentices and trainees in 2019, by sex and age group, City of Boroondara (Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research)

Age group

Males

Females

Total

<19 years

240

290

530

20-24

1,470

1,490

2,960

25-44

1,430

1,350

2,780

45-64

1,635

2,890

4,525

65 and older

260

320

580

Total

5,035

6,340

11,375

Tertiary institutions

Swinburne University Hawthorn campus offers TAFE courses and higher education degrees. In 2019, the Swinburne Hawthorn campus had 3,533 students enrolled in vocational courses and 16,102 students enrolled in higher education courses (Swinburne University, 2019 Annual Report).

The Hawthorn-Melbourne English Language Centre is an English language institute that caters predominantly for international students.

The University of Melbourne Commercial campus operates as a service provider and broker for the University of Melbourne in the areas of consultancy services, professional education and custom programs.

Adult community and further education

Adult Community and Further Education (ACFE) is defined as learning activities that are non-accredited and non-formal in nature and which contribute to the development of a person's skills and knowledge, and encourage social participation. ACFE also encompasses a range of accredited formal courses for those looking for a pathway to re-enter or re-engage with education, training and employment.

In Victoria, registered ACFE organisations are known as Learn Local providers. Three Learn Local providers operate in Boroondara:

Neighbourhood houses and U3As 

There are a total of 11 neighbourhood houses currently operate in Boroondara (2020). For more information see neighbourhood houses and community centres on the City of Boroondara Community Profile page.

U3A (University of the third age) campuses are located in Deepdene and Glen Iris. A U3A is a volunteer co-operative of people generally aged over 50 years who share educational, creative and leisure activities. 

Registered training organisations

To deliver nationally accredited VET courses, organisations must be registered with the Victorian Registration and Qualifications Authority or deliver programs under the auspice of a registered training organisation. Registered training organisations can include secondary schools, TAFEs and private providers including workplaces.

Boroondara's registered training providers include Camberwell Grammar, Methodist Ladies College, Real Estate Institute of Victoria, Relationships Australia, and Trinity Grammar

Index of Education and Occupation

The ABS's Index of Education and Occupation (IEO) is designed to reflect the educational and occupational level of communities and is based on results from the ABS Census. 

A low score indicates relatively lower education and occupation status of people in the area in general. For example, an area could have a low score if there are: 

  • many people without qualifications, or many people in low skilled occupations or many people unemployed, AND 
  • few people with a high level of qualifications or in highly skilled occupations.

High score indicates relatively higher education and occupation status of people in the area in general. For example, an area could have a high score if there are: 

  • many people with higher education qualifications or many people in highly skilled occupations, AND 
  • few people without qualifications or few people in low skilled occupations.

In 2016, Boroondara had an IEO of 1163, the second highest in Victoria (after the City of Stonnington).

Within Boroondara, the suburbs that had the highest IEO scores were Hawthorn East (1168), Glen Iris (1167) and Canterbury, Deepdene and Hawthorn (all 1166). Balwyn North, Kew East and Ashburton had the lowest IEO score in Boroondara (1128, 1140, and 1141 respectively), however, all these suburbs were in the top 10 percentile for Victoria overall.

Table 8: Index of Education and Occupation, City of Boroondara suburbs, 2016 (Source: Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA))

Suburb

Score

Percentile (Victoria)

Percentile (Australia)

Canterbury

1166

97

98

Hawthorn East

1168

99

98

Deepdene

1166

97

98

Hawthorn

1166

97

98

Kew

1163

97

97

Glen Iris

1167

98

98

Camberwell

1159

95

96

Surrey Hills

1160

96

97

Ashburton

1141

92

94

Kew East

1140

92

93

Balwyn

1143

93

94

Balwyn North

1128

90

91


Disengaged young people

Young people are considered disengaged if they are not in the labour force, employment or training. This group are not homogenous, with some voluntary, and some not. They have been categorised as including:

  • unemployed 
  • unavailable – includes carers, sickness and disability
  • disengaged – not seeking employment or education but not restricted from doing so
  • opportunity seekers – seeking work or education but holding out for opportunities befitting their skills
  • voluntary – travel, holidays, involvement in the arts and so on. 

Those in the ‘voluntary’ category are perhaps not as vulnerable as other disengaged youth. According to the last census, 153 Boroondara residents aged 15-19 years reported that they were disengaged and 643 residents aged 20-24 reported that they were disengaged. 

Surrey Hills had the highest rate of residents aged 20-24 years that were disengaged (8.0%), and along with Ashburton, also the highest rate of 15-19 year-olds that were disengaged (2.5%).

Table 9: Number and rate of disengaged residents aged 15-19 years and 20-24 years, City of Boroondara and suburbs (Source: id Consulting, City of Boroondara community profile)

Suburb

15-19 years number

15-19 years percent

20-24 years number

20-24 years percent

Boroondara

153

1.3%

643

4.8%

Ashburton

12

2.5%

35

7.5%

Balwyn

9

0.8%

59

6.2%

Balwyn North

22

1.2%

83

5.8%

Camberwell

12

0.8%

77

4.6%

Canterbury

11

1.7%

34

5.7%

Deepdene

0

0.0%

9

6.0%

Glen Iris

13

1.1%

58

5.6%

Hawthorn

17

1.2%

105

3.7%

Hawthorn East

6

0.8%

47

3.6%

Kew

18

1.1%

79

4.1%

Kew East

<5

na

22

5.2%

Surrey Hills

15

2.5%

46

8.0%

 

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